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ATHENS WORTH SEEING ACROPOLIS

ACROPOLIS
The Acropolis hill (acro - edge, polis - city), so called the "Sacred Rock" of Athens, is the most important site of the city and constitutes one of the most recognizable monuments of the world. It is the most significant reference point of ancient Greek culture, as well as the symbol of the city of Athens itself as it represent the apogee of artistic development in the 5th century BC. During Perikles' Golden Age, ancient Greek civilization was represented in an ideal way on the hill and some of the architectural masterpieces of the period were erected on its ground.

The Propylaea are the monumental entrances to the sacred area dedicated to Athena, the patron goddess of the city. Built by the architect Mnesicles with Pentelic marble, their design was avant-garde. To the south-west of the Propylaea, on a rampart protecting the main entrance to the Acropolis, is the Ionian temple of Apteros Nike, which is now being restored.

The first habitation remains on the Acropolis date from the Neolithic period. Over the centuries, the rocky hill was continuously used either as a cult place or as a residential area or both. The inscriptions on the numerous and precious offerings to the sanctuary of Athena (marble korai, bronze and clay statuettes and vases) indicate that the cult of the city's patron goddess was established as early as the Archaic period (650-480 B.C.).


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ABOUT ACROPOLIS
Acropolis through history
Parthenon
Parthenon disasters
Erectheion
Temple of Athena Nike
The Propylaea
PARTHENON MARBLES
Centre for the Acropolis Studies
Cyclopean masonry
What are the marbles for the Greeks
New 7 wonders of the world
Bring them back
PARTHENON MODEL

ACROPOLIS VIDEOS

Travel to Athens Video Gallery  - Akropolis - A tour in the archaeological site of Akropolis, starting from Dionysos theater and ending on the sacred rock of Akropolis of Athens with Parthenon, Propylea and Erectheion.  -  A video with duration 1 min 57 sec and a size of 2323 Kb
 

ACROPOLIS PHOTOS

ACROPOLIS HILL - View of the Acropolis from the southwest, showing the Propylaia, the Temple of Athena Nike, part of the Erechtheion, and the Parthenon. Also visible on the South Slope are the Odeion of Herodes Atticus and the Stoa of Eumenes. Photo taken in 1998. PROPYLAIA - The western approach to the Acropolis, showing the Propylaia, Temple of Athena Nike, and the Parthenon. View from the west (from the Pnyx). ERECTHEION - Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheion. Southeast corner. View from the southeast.

View of the Acropolis and Parthenon from the southwest - Photo taken in 1998. View of the Acropolis and the South Slope from the southwest (from near the Philopappos Monument). - In the background to the right of the Parthenon are Mt. Lykabettos and Mt. Penteli. Photo taken in 1998. View of the Acropolis and the South Slope from the southwest (from near the Philopappos Monument). - In the background to the right of the Parthenon are Mt. Lykabettos and Mt. Penteli. Photo taken in 1998.

View of the Erechtheion, the Parthenon, and the south wall of the Acropolis. - View from the southwest (from near the Philopappos Monument). In the background to the right of the Parthenon are Mt. Lykabettos and Mt. Penteli. Photo taken in 1998. The Acropolis as seen from the Areopagus. - View from the northwest. The western end of the Acropolis as seen from the Areopagus. - View from the northwest.

The North and East Slopes of the Acropolis. View from the northeast. - View from the northeast. The western approach to the Acropolis, showing the Propylaia and Temple of Athena Nike. - View from the northwest (from Theorias Street). The Propylaia and the western ascent to the Acropolis. - View from the west (from the Pnyx).

The Propylaia. View of the western facade and central corridor. - There were six Doric columns across the front, with three tall and slender Ionic columns on either side of the central corridor. Photo taken from the Nike Bastion. The eastern facade of the Propylaia. - View from the stylobate of the Parthenon. The Propylaia and western ascent to the Acropolis. - View from the west. Photo taken in 1997.

The Beule Gate (The Late Roman entrance to the Acropolis). - Built into the wall above the doorway are remains of the choregic monument of Nikias. The Propylaia (north wing). - Photo taken in 1997. The Propylaia (south wing) and Nike Bastion. - Photo taken in 1997.

The Propylaia (north wing). - Photo taken in 1997. The Propylaia (central section). - Photo taken in 1997. The Propylaia (south wing) and Nike Bastion. - Photo taken in 1997.

The Pinakothiki of the Propylaia. - The southwest wing of the Propylaia. - The southwest wing of the Propylaia and Temple of Athena Nike. -

The Pinakothiki of the Propylaia. - Temple of Athena Nike. - Western facade and northern flank. View from the northwest (from near the Beule Gate). Temple of Athena Nike. Western facade. - View from below the Nike Bastion.

The Acropolis as seen from the Areopagus. - View from the northwest. The Parthenon, western facade. - View from east of the Temple of Athena Nike. The large limestone boulders in the forground are part of the Mycenaean fortification wall. The Parthenon, eastern facade. -

The Parthenon, western facade and northern flank. - View from the northwest. The Parthenon, western facade. - The Parthenon, western facade and northern flank. - View from the northwest (from near the Propylaia).

The Parthenon, northern side. - View from the north (near the north wall of the Acropolis, east of the Erechtheion). The Parthenon, eastern facade. - The Parthenon, southeastern corner. -

The northern pteron of the Parthenon. - Recent examination of this area by M. Korres has discovered cuttings in the marble floor for a small shrine and altar here, possibly indicating the location of an early cult of Athena on this side of the Acropolis. The cella (or naos) of the Parthenon. - View from the inside, at approximately the same location as the statue of Athena Parthenos, looking east. General view of the Erechtheion from the southwest, showing the North Porch (at left), the Olive Tree of Athena (modern replacement!), and the Carytatid Porch. - Note the modern (white) blocks of Pentelic marble which have been used in the reconstruction of the building. The blue limestone foundations of the Old Athena Temple (built c. 510-500 BC and destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC) are visible south of the E

General view of the Erechtheion from the southwest, showing the North Porch (at left), the - The blue limestone foundations of the Old Athena Temple (built c. 510-500 BC and destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC) are visible in the foreground. Photo taken in 1998. View of the entire west side of the Erechtheion. - Photo taken in 1997. View of the south and east sides of the Erechtheion. The blue limestone foundations of the Old Athena Temple (built c. 510-500 BC and destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC) are visible in the foreground. - Photo taken in 1989, from the southeast (from the northern pteron of the Parthenon).

South and east sides of the Erechtheion. - View from the southeast. The east (front) side of the Erechtheion. - This side of the temple gives the appearance of a The east and south sides of the Erechtheion (with tourists for scale). - View from the east (and slightly to the south).

The South Porch or Caryatid Porch of the Erechtheion. Caryatids (or Karyatids) are female figures used as architectural supports in place of columns -- a feature associated with Ionic architecture. - The Roman architect Vitruvius wrote that Caryatids were supposed to represent the women of the southern Greek town of Caryae which supported the invading Persian force in 480 BC. After the Persian Wars, the other Greek states forced them to carry objects View of the Acropolis, its South and East Slopes, and the Olympieion from the Ardettos Hill. - CARYATID -

APTEROS NIKI TEMPLE - The ionic temple of Apteros Niki (Featherless Victory), which is being erected today, is situated southwest of the Entrance, on a rampart protecting the main entrace of the Acropolis. A monument of the 5th century bc. Zeus Temple - View of the temple of Zeus and Lycabetus Hill in the background


NEWS FOR : ACROPOLIS RESTAURANTS